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QardioArm

$228.85

Finally, a smart blood pressure monitor that fits your daily life.

QardioArm is a blood pressure monitor with a revolutionary design and effortless user experience that conveniently fits your modern lifestyle. The idea behind the product was to create a medical device that looks like a daily object and is simple and convenient to have around at all times for daily measurements.

NOW WITH PLACES FUNCTION - monitor blood pressure changes across multiple locations!

   

Registered Health Care Providers login here or if you are an HCP wishing to set up an account click here .

QardioArm is a blood pressure monitor with a revolutionary design and effortless user experience that conveniently fits your modern lifestyle. The idea behind the product was to create a medical device that looks like a daily object and is simple and convenient to have around at all times for daily measurements.

NOW WITH PLACES FUNCTION!

Everyone’s blood pressure varies during the day: it tends to be highest in the morning and lowest in the evening, and may change depending on activity, or due to anxiety or stress. With modern, dynamic lifestyles these daily changes can occur more often. Places can help QardioArm users, together with their physicians, to keep track of their blood pressure measurements not only at different times, but also in different locations, in a way that may be more effective for busy people who want to understand their heart health better and take control.

QardioArm is easy to use and works wirelessly with your iOS or Android device. A full user manual and guide can be found here

Or you can find a range of video guides at the Qardio YouTube Channel. Simply click on the YouTube icon below.

The QardioArm App is available on both the iOS App Store and Google Play for your Android Device. Please see the below icons to be directed to the download links:

   

SMART & CONNECTED

The Qardio App reminds you when it's time for your measurement 

EFFORTLESS USER EXPERIENCE - SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT

Allows you to automatically share your data with loved ones and doctors 

DATA INSIGHTS

It stores all your readings to provide better preventative heart care

Hypertension (High blood pressure) is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease and renal failure. The risk of disease increases as the level of blood pressure increases. High blood pressure is also associated with other risk factors. 

What is high blood pressure? 

Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood on the walls of the arteries and is written as systolic/diastolic (e.g. 120/80 mmHg, stated as '120 over 80'). For use in Australasian surveys, high blood pressure is defined as: systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than or equal to 140 mmHg, or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) greater than or equal to 90 mmHg, or receiving medication for high blood pressure. 

Major causes of high blood pressure 

The causes of high blood pressure are both biomedical and lifestyle oriented. Major causes include overweight, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, dietary salt intake and nutrition patterns which involve a low intake of fruit and vegetables and a high intake of saturated fat. Stress raises blood pressure transiently but in the long term may have indirect effects by influencing eating, drinking smoking and physical activity patterns. Tobacco smoking increases the risk of heart attack and stroke threefold in hypertensive individuals. 

How many Australians have high blood pressure? 

The 1999-2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (which took blood pressure measurements) indicates that around 3.7 million Australians over the age of 25 had high blood pressure or were on medication for that condition. This equates to 32% of men and 27% of women. Based on self-reports from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' National Health Survey 2004-05, it is estimated that about 2.1 million Australians have high blood pressure. This corresponds to 10% of the population. However, self-reported data are not as reliable as measured data. There has been a decline in the proportion of people with high blood pressure and/or receiving treatment since the 1980s. There has also been a decline in average blood pressure levels since the 1980s. However, data from the 2004-05 study of general practice activity in Australia show that high blood pressure is the most common problem managed by general practitioners, accounting for 6% of all problems managed. 

**Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)